Thursday, April 3, 2014

We're English 10 Nerds and Loving It: April 3, 2014

Focus: What larger patterns are coming clear in F451?

1. Warming up: Designing your ideal playground, comparing it to today's vanilla playgrounds, and reading about "The Overprotected Kid"

Before you read...

  • Design your ideal playground (sketch it or describe it in words).  Create it from bottom to top, starting with what the ground would be made of, what the playground itself would be made of, what equipment it would have (if any equipment at all), how tall it would be, what colors it would have, etc.
  • How do think your playground compares to playgrounds today?


As you skim the article, please respond to these questions in your notes...


  • What is "The Land," and what makes it unique?
  • What's happened to our playgrounds over the years and why?
  • What is problematic about today's playgrounds?


After you read...

  • What connections can you make between this article and F451?


2. Enjoying F451 Fishbowl #6: Pages 102-139

3. Wrapping up

HW:
1. Bring F451 or your independent reading book to class tomorrow for 20-30 minutes of reading time.

2. Work on your book talk if you have not given your book talk yet.

3. Finish F451 and your final yellow observation chart for Monday.

227 comments:

  1. Do you think that it was a good idea for Montag to kill Beatty?

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    1. He would have been arrested otherwise, so I think he was desperate and decided that killing him was his only option. He would have chosen a different option if he had one.

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    2. I feel like he would have been able to come up with something else, killing isn't usually a last resort.

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    3. Maybe, it will probably have adverse effects later in the book but it should help him complete his mission because one of his enemies is out of the picture.

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    4. I think in Montag's current situation it was a good idea to kill beatty because if he hadn't he would have been arrested like carter said and he never could keep reading books

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  2. Maybe Montag killed Beatty because he knew Beatty would not join him or maybe it was because Beatty betrayed him.

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  3. What is the significance of this quote "t’s perpetual motion; the thing man wanted to invent but never did . . . It’s a mystery. . . . Its real beauty is that it destroys responsibility and consequences . . . clean, quick, sure; nothing to rot later. Antibiotic, aesthetic, practical."?

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  4. On page 105, it says ".....Baetty tossed the book in the trash basket." Why do you think Beatty doesn't have any tolerance for books?

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    1. He has been trained to think that books are dangerous and can destroy someone's mind. He even uses literature to back him up in order to prove to someone that he knows the bad things that come from books.

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  5. Why do you not think Montag is not necessarily mad at Mildred?

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  6. On page 106 Beatty says,"Bang, your ready to blow up the world, chop off heads, knock down women and children, destroy authority." Do you think She really means all of this? Since she has been through it all.

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  7. On page 119, Montag describes Beatty as a monstrous black snail. In the bible a snail is looked at as a sinful person. I think that it is very ironic how many connections this book has with the bible. Do you think that Montag will follow what the bible has told him to carry on his rebellion/quest for knowledge?

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  8. On page 131 Faber says, "'I feel alive for the first time in years.'" Do you think he regrets helping Montag or would he do it again despite the danger it put him in?

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    1. I think he would do it again because of the danger. He hasn't spoken out ever, so I think he wants to, because it could start something, and bring back books.

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  9. On page 122 Montag says, "Beatty wanted to die." Do you think that Captain Beatty really wanted to die?

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    1. I think that Beatty didnt want to die but she didnt want to live at the same point.

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    2. No I think he was just trying to convince himself that what he did wasn't bad.

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    3. He was desperate for something to convince him that what he did needed to be done and wasn't a bad thing to do, when in reality he feels an endless guilt that will probably haunt him.

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  10. every fireman went through a phase of wanting to learn about books, but they returned to the fire house where montague tried to rebel.

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  11. Do you think Montag has become emotionally detached? When he enjoys burning his own house as much as he enjoyed burning those of others, and he begins to agree with Beatty that fire is removing his problems.

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  12. I believe that how they respond to what Montag and Faber are doing is that the mechanical hound will come and catch them. The reaction of people around them will all bring out the emotions and start a resistance. I agree with Shaun about an outburst of violence.

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  13. nick- i think he will keep running and find a way out because now he is in it so he needs to keep wiith it.

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  14. "for I was doing a terrible thing in using the very books you clung to, to rebut you on every hand." (107) Here we see another example of irony in the book, I think that Ray Bradbury is trying to tell us that often times we will find that not a lot of people will stay true to their word.

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  15. When Montag found out it was his house that they were supposed to burn down. How do you think that Montag felt knowing all that he had worked for was going to be destroyed?

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    1. When Montag first found out that his house was going to be burnt down he was shocked but then he readily burnt his entire house down, destroying his past life in the process. He hasn't really worked for much in his life yet so it was not a loss for him. It was a positive experience because he was able to erase his past life.

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    2. He was sad because everything he had done was all gonna turn to ashes and on page 129 it says "His eyes watered" which shows that Montags goal to bring back books to this world was over.

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  16. On page 114, Mildred says, "Poor family, everything gone wow." I think this foreshadows the last time that Montag and Mildred will ever see each other, because throughout the book they have started to go their separate ways. Mildred wants to follow the government, and is okay where she is in her life, while Montag wants to know more about the strange concept of "books".

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  17. Do you think it is interesting that Montag thinks that If he is killed on TV, he thinks it could sum up his whole life in a few words in the brief moments before his death so as to make an impact on the people watching?

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    1. I think it is interesting because then he can use mass media to affect the entire population and possibly start a movement.

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  18. I think people are censoring sadness from there life because in the first part of the book montags wife tries to kill herself and then the next day she acts like nothing ever happened.

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  19. Do you think it's okay that Montag goes and plants books in the Blacks house even though they are innocent?

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    1. Mr. Black is a fireman, and to Montag that is not innocent. He has convinced himself that nobody is innocent because nobody thinks the way he does.

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    2. He is certainly taking a risk and think it is worth it. I personally believe it is because of what is at stake and the cause it is for.

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    3. He's using every tool at his disposal to change the world they live in for he better, so I think that it is a good thing that he planted the books.

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  20. Do you guys think eveything was Guy's fault and he regrets even trying to change peoples minds to like books?

    I think that not everything is his fault and that it is human to question the ideas of authority and he just wanted to explain to people that the way they are living is a false way to live.

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    1. I do believe that everything that has happened is Montags fault but I do not think he regrets what has happened because he does not want to live the life society wants him to and he is trying to break that and help other people do the same.

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  21. On page 135 Faber explains that he doesn't want Montage to be found out when he leaves. Do they still want to keep in touch.

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    1. Yeah they are the only ones who share a connection of a rebellious nature. They give each other hope so they have to keep in touch.

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  22. On page 105 Beatty says to Montag "Sweet food of sweetly uttered knowledge Sir Phillip Sidney said. But on the other hand: Words are like leaves and where they most abound, Much fruit of sense beneath is rarely found.' Alexander Pope." Why does Beatty quote these to Montag? Is it about Montag quoting books? Doesn't that mean Beatty reads books too?

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  23. Do you believe that montag will ever find the happiness he is looking for throughout his book plans? Why does he think that his happiness resides in books?

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    1. He sees how society suppresses him and knows that freedom will bring in happiness. I do not think we will see Montag achieve this however because it is a book and books like this generally don't end well or they end weird.

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    2. I think that Montag is following Clarisses footsteps and he won't happy until he has accomplished his his goal to bring back books.

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  24. "We've stopped in front of my house" (110)
    What are Montags emotions when he is saying this?

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    1. He seems confused, but also betrayed. He gets why his house is being burnt, but he never thought it would happen to him.

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  25. I think that montag wasn't cautious enough because he kept reading poetry out loud constantly.

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  27. "Shall I talk some more? I like your look of panic. Swahili, Indian, English Lit., I speak them all."(107)
    How did Beatty become smart enough to the point where he can speak all of these different languages and have such a large vocabulary while the rest of society is dumb? Was he educated somehow?

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    1. I think he either was educated before everything happened, or he has read books, that he says is wrong to do. Didn't he say he also went through the phase of wanting to read books too?

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    2. I think that he has taught himself because he mentioned he went down the same path as Montag. But to me it seems a bit hypocritical because he is looking to punish Montag for something he did himself and did not suffer for and he still is able to quote many of different literary pieces and does not think of what he is saying as wrong.

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  28. "If there were no war if there was peace in the worlds id say fine have fun but Montag, you mustn't go back to being just a fireman. All isn't well with the world."(104) When faber said this do you really think he meant that Montag shouldn't be a fireman any more?

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  29. Do you think montag acted rationally when killing beatty? or was it just in the heat of the moment. Also, Beatty didnt seem really reluctant to when Montag was threatening him, why wasnt Beatty armed?

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    1. I think Montag did the right thing by killing Beatty because there was really no other way to go that is right. I don't think Beatty was armed because he did not think Montag would ever do something like that. Which is only stupidity on his part. He handed Montag the flamethrower without thinking it through. I wonder if in a way that could symbolize Beatty punishing himself for all he has done by essentially killing himself.

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  30. I agree with Jack Because he said that he doesn't believe that he has a conchance And I agree with this because he has done some dumb things that would jeopardize his life. He didn't really think of the consequences

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  31. On page 132, Faber brings up the idea that there are Harvard graduates on the tracks. Do you think that Faber and Montag are going to join with other forces to create a revolution of knowledge?

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    1. I think that this is a possibility but I don't think we will see this happen because the book is almost over. I think there will be a major plot twist.

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  32. "He watched the scene, fascinated, not wanting to move. It seemed so remote and no part of him....." (134) I think that this is one of the most important points in the story because this is the first time in Montag's life that he has rebelled against authority and he is so shocked from it that he doesn't want to move.

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    1. He's surprised at the amount of damage he has caused. He thought he was rebelling in a small inconspicuous way but once it was brought to light he realized the extent of what he was doing. It amazed him.

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  33. I think that Faber is truly trying to help Montag learn about books but he will ditch him at the first sign of him being caught, making him not as trust worthy as he should be.

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  34. I think if Montag kept everything to himself then there would be no action in the book. He would continue to work at the fire station and most likely never start reading

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  35. Who do you think montag will eventually go to for help? Will he find more outlaws like him and do they maybe have the same goals as him?

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  36. Would montag start collecting books again after running away?

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  37. "Was it my wife that turned in the alarm?"
    Why is his first guess Mildred? Three other women knew about it so why was he thinking it was his wife?

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  38. I think that Montag burns down his own house to symbolize him making a complete change from the beginning of the book and he is getting rid of his past.

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  39. The mistake Montag made was letting people know for a fact he owns books which Beatty explains, "...Her friends turned in an alarm earlier that I let ride. One way or the other, you'd have got it. It was pretty silly, quoting poetry around free and easy like that." (Bradbury 117). Beatty can recite lines because he owns books, he just does not let anyone know it.

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  40. I think Ray Bradbury made Montag burn his own house because it was a punishment. Beatty wanted to make sure that Montag got the message so he made him burn all of his belongings

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    1. It also allows him to "restart" in a way. he no longer has to hide his books ,or be judged by someone in his own house for reading.

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  41. What is montags overall goal? what exactly is he hoping to achieve by running away, his life won't be very good as an outlaw.

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  42. I think the idea of Montag burning his house down. Is a symbol of destroying his past, and the start of a new beginning. I think that Montag has to do this to tell himself that he needs to destroy his past to fuel him in the future.

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  43. When montag is forced to burn his house down, does that show how he is washing away his past with the very thing that is used to burn away his beliefs about rebelling? He is using his past job with his past beleifs to burn away his current beliefs but it also means he's starting completely new.

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  44. I think Bradbury chooses Montag to burn down his own house because he wants to get to the readers feelings.

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  45. Do you think Montag will get caught by the hounds or the police? Why?

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  46. Why do you think Mildred turned herself and Montag in for having books, when she knows that it is going to kill Montag in the end? Also do you think that she is being selfish by running away?

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    1. Mildred decided to turn Montag in because she doesn't really love him and he doesn't truly love her. Like earlier in the book when it said "He cried. Not at the thought of death, but at the thought that he wouldn't have cried at death"

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  47. How does Montag feel about his house being a fireman stop?

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    1. I think he was a bit shocked but knew at some point it was going to happen. He couldnt have expected Mildred to stay quiet forever, shes against books

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  48. Will Montag eventually get into trouble for what he did to the house?

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    1. He probably will. I mean he did burn the chief and he still has some books. So I think that the Hound is still after him.

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  49. "He watched the scene, fascinated, not wanting to move. It seemed so remote and no part of him....." (134) Do you think this scene is important? Is Montag starting to rebel?

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  50. "Montag shot one continuous pulse of liquid fire on him." Why did Montag murder Beatty? Well he get in trouble for it?

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    1. He murdered Beatty, probably because Beatty may find out that Montag will have more books and he also kind of sent the Hound after Montag so I guess it's because of revenge. He definitely will get in trouble for it because he murdered an "innocent" person

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    2. I think he burnt Beatty because that was the only way he was going to be able to get away. He is already in trouble for having books, so if he gets caught he will be punished for everything he did

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    3. I think he burned Beatty because he wanted to save himself. We've learned how selfish this society is and even though Montag seems different from the rest, he is only trying to save himself and what he wants to achieve.

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  51. In the beginning of the reading, Montag seemed like he was really influenced by Beatty's opinion. Why do you think he obeyed him? Was it fear? Lack of self confidence?

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    1. I think in the beginning Montag didn't understand how bad his society was and how important books really are. So in the beginning he obeyed, but when he learned about books, he started to rebel.

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    2. I think he was so influenced by Beatty because he didn't know anything else. He didn't know why books were s important

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  52. Pg 119 "Well, that's one way to get an audience. Hold a gun on a
    man and force him to listen to your speech. Speech away. What'll it be this time? Why don't you belch Shakespeare at me, you fumbling snob? `There is no terror, Cassius, in your threats, for I am arm'd so strong in honesty that they pass by me as an idle wind, which I respect not!' How's that? Go ahead now, you second-hand litterateur, pull the trigger." Do you think Beatty wanted Montag to kill him? He kept antagonizing Montag to do it.

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    1. Yes I do think Beatty wanted Montag to kill him. I believe that although he is the captain he also wanted to read books and talk to montag about them but he knew he would never be able to. He was ready to die.

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  53. I believe that maybe Montag will one day be at peace with him having to burn down his own house and all his belongings because this is what will allow him to start new. Make a new name for himself and be his own person.

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    1. The fire seems to be his way of cleansing himself and starting over He has hope for his future and a new slate.

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    2. I think that Montag is at peace now because he was worried and now he doesn't have to be.

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  54. "...Beatty tossed the book in the trash basket." (105) Do you think Beatty has been brainwashed to believe that books can destroy minds?

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    1. I think that everybody has been convinced that books can destroy. I think that Beatty just has such a hatred towards books because he has realized that as the fire chief he has much more power than everybody else and throughout his life, he has abused that power.

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  55. When Mildred rushes out of the house saying "Poor family. Oh everything gone, everything." (114). Is this lack of commitment and love a common thing in this society? Or just the lack of love in Montag's marriage?

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    1. I think this is a common thing in this society because when Mildred had her friends over they were talking about the war, Mrs Phelps one of her friends talked about how if her husband were to die she would just remarry. I dont think theyre is real love in the society. They marry just to marry

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    2. There is definitely a lack of love in this society. In previous pages in the book, the author describes how parents don't love their children. There isn't any true and loving relationships anymore.

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  56. On page 119, Montag uses Bible references to describe Beatty as a "monstrous snail". Why do you think the author feels that the Bible is such an important reference in this book?

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  57. ¨She shoved the valise in the waiting beetle, climbed in , and sat mumbling...¨ (pg 114) Do you think at this moment Montag was more upset with the fact that his wife set the alarm or the fact that she was leaving him?

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    1. I think he was more upset that she turned him in and that his books are destroyed because he never really loved Mildred and probably doesnt care if she leaves

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  58. When one of the ladies at Montag/Mildred's house and she says, "No use going through all that pain for a baby" (96) It shows how she doesn't think that kids are that important, because they aren't worth the pain. Is there anyway that this reflects the selfishness of the society? Or even the selfishness of our society seeming that people are aborting their own kids?

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    1. I agree that this quote shows the selfishness in our society and that of in the book. We are all selfish at times and this helps us reflect on our own selves.

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  59. I think that Beatty was sick of his life, even if it was from the smallest part of his mind. Beatty kept poking at Montag and even when he was faced with the real thought of dying he never backed down. "Go ahead now, you second-hand litterateur, pull the trigger"(119)

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  60. How did Beatty become so smart? He said he could speak multiple languages. How was he educated?

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    1. Why was it necessary to speak multiple languages? Were they even allowed to travel around to different places?

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    2. When I was reading I also noticed that. Beatty was so educated and could quote so many things. Like quoting Alexander Pope on page 106 I think that the people in power like Beatty are using books to put themselves in a position that is above everyone else

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  61. What does the Mechanical Hound represent throughout the book?

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    1. I think that the hound represented the guilt or fear that Montag has because he was afraid of the hound. Montag was hiding books and he thought that the hound would get him for having books.

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  62. On page 115 Montag was calling himself a fool and a idiot after his leg was hurting him. Did he know what he did was bad? What did he learn?

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    1. I think he was calling himself a fool because he acted emotionally. By showing the books, and being too obvious, he threw out any chance he had at all of fighting this society.

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  63. When Montag didn't really have anywhere to go. Why do you think Montag choose to go to Faber first instead of just leaving the town right away?

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    1. I think he looked to Faber as his last hope. Montag, at this point, had lost everything he had worked his whole life for and by going to Faber I think he was praying that before being forced to leaving town he could gain any last bit of knowledge possible.

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    2. I agree I think he looked for Faber for advice and knowledge as to what he should do. I think Faber might have been his last resort for hope.

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  64. On page 118 after Montag killed Faber and was running away what was going through his mind? Did he have a specific place to run to?

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    1. I dont think he had any place to run to because on page 131 Faber askes him "What are your plans?" he says "To keep running." so i am not sure that he had a specific place to go he just didn't want t be there.

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  65. Will Montags rebellion make any difference to the people living in this society? Are they all too hypnotized to ever be awakened. Does it just take one person to make this big of a difference? Like Clarisse was able to change Montags life.

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    1. It won't make that much of a difference, people will just think he's crazy and go back living the same.

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    2. This will make the society come together and they all will be changed forever. Montag was the main difference in this society.

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  66. Beatty makes a statement about fire, "The thing man wanted to invent but never did", I think this quote relates to our society today because we have always wanted to be able to completely control fire, but have not been able too. We do have the power to contain it, if under small circumstances, but if it is overwhelming fire will always be able to over take us.

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  67. "Beatty wanted to die" Why did he want to die? Does everyone secretly want to die in this terrible society?

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    1. I think everybody that is knowlagdable does want to die in this society because they realize the flaws of their society and how the society will never be fixed

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  68. On page 132, Faber brings up the idea that there are Harvard graduates on the tracks; do you think Faber and Montag are going to join with other forces to create an innovation of knowledge?

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  69. I think that Beatty did have books, he was just able to get away with it because no one would have suspected him. Did the fact that he had books lead to his want to die? He was burning books while he was reading them, would this break a person?

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  70. I think that Beatty didn't entirely believe the things he had said about books. He recited all of those quotes, showing that he had those books. If he believed what he actually said about the books, he would never had completed one. I believe he upholds and supports this society's ways because he wanted to be superior.

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  71. Where will Montag go now? He doesn't have any family or friends outside the fire station. Will he continue to rebel and try to convince people to accept books? Or will he just give up and start a new life just like his old one?

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    1. I think he will give up and end up having to start a new life somewhere else.

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    2. Montag is at the river. I think that Montag might go off in the direction away from the town and try to start a new life in another town.

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    3. I think that he will go somewhere new but keep doing what he was doing because thats what he has been doing and he has been doing this for a while.

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  72. On page 122 the book says, "Beatty wanted to die" To me this is pretty interesting. In a society where everyone is happy why would somebody want to die?

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    1. Beatty seems so be revealing his true sadness and that happiness is nonexistent in this society.

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  73. Why would they make there "crowd control" hound not fireproof? That was very stupid on their part. My real questions is, do you think that fire chief's are part of the government? He seems to know so much about books, but he's not supposed to have any, and he also knows reasons why they don't have books.

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  74. Does this show that a society and/or a person can come up from the ashes and start new again?

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  75. When Montag says, "Beatty wanted to die". Did Beatty actually want to die or did he just not care about what could happen to him and put himself in the position where he got killed?

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    1. I think that Montag just tells himself that Beatty wanted to die to feel less guilty but I also think that Beatty put himself in front of danger because he believed he had so much power over Montag and Montag wouldn't be brave enough to hurt him.

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  76. Would Montag have done what he did if he never met Clarisse?

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    1. I dont think he would have because Clarisse kind of woke him up, and got him to think more about everything that's going on

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    2. I feel that Clarisse came into the book as a prophet figure like in the Bible. She revealed Montag's true self and helped him see the light that was hidden from him.

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    3. No, I feel as if Clarisse could be compared to a splash of cold water on Montag's face. She was the "awakening" Montag needed to see society from a different point of view. She triggered something inside of Montag that made him question the way he had been living his life.

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  77. " I feel alive for the first time in years" Faber said, Why do you think nothing else has made him feel alive when they live in a society where it is normal to burn books?

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    1. I think because everything in this society is boring and repetitive. You don't get to do whatever you want, you can't really live.

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  78. Did Mildred know what she was doing when she betrayed Montage, or was she just doing what society told her to do? Will she just want to forget about him? She seemed more sad that she was leaving her fake family that the fact that she was leaving her real husband.

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    1. Mildred is simply just another product of society. I don't think that she fully realized what would happen to Montag but on the other hand, I don't think she really cared.

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    2. I believe it was society's influence on leaving her "family". She doesn't truly love them for she is selfish and has no knowledge of loving someone and experiencing tragedy.

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  79. I found it very odd how Beatty, in the fire station and talking to Montag was able to easily quote books from legendary writers. How and when was he given the opportunity to read all these books?

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    1. He was alive before books were banned so he could have read it then

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    2. She was probably given this opportunity when she was younger so she was prepared for talking to Montag.

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    3. Beatty tell Montag that every fireman had an urge or itch to read the book that they are burning. I think Beatty was one of the fireman that read the books. I think Beatty read the books before he burned them.

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  80. What will happen to this society if Montag leaves and goes somewhere else?

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    1. I dont think anything will change because he hasnt influinced anyone else

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    2. I think Society will go back to how it was before and just forget about Montag. I don't think Mildred will forget as easily though.

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    3. Yeah I agree with Andy because so far he hasn't figured anything out he is still learning the ways of the books. So society won't change if he leaves.

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  81. When Montag returns to the fire station Montag feels, "beaten unmercifully" (107)
    How is it that Montag is beaten up when all that Beatty is doing is sharing a dream that he had about him?

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    1. Montag feels that he has been "beaten unmercifully" because even though he is only hearing of a dream because this dream that Beatty speaks of is really more of an idea of how Beatty sees Montag's and his position. Beatty was showing Montag that he knows that there is no way to beat him and that for every quote he has to say about books, Beatty had three ready to shut them down. It was a mental battle that was meant to discourage Montag.

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  82. I think that Ray Bradbury is trying to warn us of the future with an extreme scenario. Society is growing more distant and we are more interested in text than a real conversation. Montag has the courage to "write the other way" in his society and he changed for the better. I think that Bradbury wants more people to do this, that way we can avoid going in the direction of this society.

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  83. When Beatty said on pg(113)"It's all in her file." Do you think the government keeps a file for everybody?

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    1. Yes, the government keeps a file of everyone today and records of their life. So it is probably very likely that the government have records of everybody.

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    2. Yes. They know a lot about everyone, more than you could figure out by just observing someone.

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  84. On page 131 Faber says, "'I feel alive for the first time in years.'" Do you think he regrets helping Montag or would he do it again despite the danger it put him in?

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    1. Faber would want to do it again despite the danger because I think Faber wishes that he could have done something more when they were banning the books in the first place. He says he feels alive, which could definitely show that he doesn't care if he gets put into danger.

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    2. I think he would do it again because people will tend to say that when they do something adventurous and gets the blood and makes you feel like you have done something. I think he would definitely do it again.

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    3. I say Faber would do it again because of what he said, he feels alive.

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    4. I believe that Faber would do it again. In such a restricted community, people don't get the chance to do something out of the ordinary. If I were in that situation, I would jump at the chance to do something adventurous.

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    5. Faber up till Montag needed help was probably living the same lives as others; boring and unexciting. Then when Montag needed help so he set aside his boring life to live a little on the thrilling dangerous side. I'd have to say not only Faber but everybody else living a lie like Faber and Clarisse, would help without any regrets.

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  85. "Knowledge is more than equivalent to force." pg. 106. Beatty said this to Montag while at work. In my mind I thought that this meant being smart is equal to being strong in society. How would someone being smart like Montag, cause problems to this society?

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    1. He would do something similar to what Clarisse did. He might go and open up someones mind like Clarisse did to him.

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    2. If someone is smarter than someone else, it threatens the equality, and mediocre tone of their society, and probably upsets the government.

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    3. Being smart like Montag in this society is a problem because the society is being pushed to be a certain way, but Montag having the knowledge he has is not willing to conform. He is willing to stand up against it unlike others that don't have as much knowledge.

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    4. I think that people that are more intelligent are more able to see the problems on a bigger scale. People that are smarter tend to be more curious, which could cause them to find problems in a society like in this book. Like Montag, once they find the problems they might be more willing to take an effort to fix them.

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  86. On page 107 Beatty says "And you shrieked knowledge is power!” If knowledge is power then is that why the society is stopping the creative flow of the people? If one person has more knowledge do they become superior?

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    1. They want to stop having knowledge maybe because it is power and maybe the people that are smart would be able to have the mindset to overpower the government. If one person has more knowledge they can spread the knowledge that they have and the wisdom so they could become superior. Could fear be over powering the people from fighting back? Is all of this caused from fear?

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  87. On page 103 it says "there would be neither fire nor water, but wine." What do you think this means? What do you think this my symbolize?

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    1. Fire i believe is represented by destruction and violence and water is the calm settled people in the society who know the laws and some hide what they know while others just live a boring life. Wine is rich and expensive in our world so in Fahrenhiet 451 wine could symbolize the color and thrilling side of their lives.

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    2. This quote shows that Montag envisioned that by mixing the culture that he has been exposed to his whole life and the culture of the past which are two opposite societies, there can be a new one. Just like is says in the continued quote when it says "Out of two separate and opposite things a third."

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  88. On page 103, after Montag had read the poetry aloud, and was starting to get upset, Faber reminds him that he was just recently like the women, in denial of books. Do you think that discouraged Montag, or gave him hope that maybe they can change quickly too?

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  89. "Burnt." Montag said. Page 122. How does this word reflect on their society? Why is this the word he chooses when Faber asks where the audio-capsule was? In what voice do you image he said this? Do you think he was happy it was burned or was he showing violence or in a sorrowful voice?

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  90. "If you hide your ignorance, no one will hit you and you'll never learn" I think of Clarisse, how she disregarded the law and now is dead. No one taught her how to hide her knowledge, unlike Faber, who is very wise and understands his society so he hides what he knows to keep himself safe. What have you learned from your ignorance in your past?

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    1. I think that Faber is saying that anyone who doesn't know something and has the audacity to ask a question is punished in their society. He's saying, because he didn't become ignorant, he learned more and more. The rest of their society is thoughtless and fears any form of questioning so they punish anyone who does. Faber is saying that he didn't conform in order to keep learning, in order to continue thinking.

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  91. One of Beatty's favorite sayings was "Don't face a problem, burn it." What do you think fire represents in their society? To me it seems like an eraser, the tool they turn to to permanently get rid of something that is infringing upon someone's happiness. Without fire, would they be able to keep their society stable?

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    1. I think fire is the only way they deal with things in their society. Instead of trying to work things out, or discussing problems, they turn to quick fixes such as fire. That doesn't do anything for their society, and it makes them go in circles around all their issues, and they'll never really get resolved.

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    2. I totally agree with you and how fire is like an eraser. The society uses it to forget problems that come up. I don't think that without fire their society would not be stable. There would be too many people becoming more intelligent and their society would be completely different.

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  92. On page 139 Ray Bradbury writes" But he was at the river". In this moment Montag is finally at a place were it looks like he will be safe. Now in slave times, sometime slaves would escape from the south to the north by hiding in the rivers. With that connection, what do you think rivers symbolism?

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    1. That's a really interesting connection. I think that the river symbolizes hope for safety and freedom. Montag wants to escape his society and the river seems to be his way out.

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    2. I think that the rivers represent a place of safety, and freedom. For once Montag can just peacefully float along the river, and sit for awhile. Normally in their society all they do is go, go, go. They drive 100 miles an hour, or more, and are always doing something. Their society says that you should always be busy, while the river says relaxing is a good thing.

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  93. On page 109 Beatty says “Here we go to keep the world happy, Montag!” Do you think Beatty really believe what he is saying? Is the world happier without books?

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    1. I think this goes back to the first conversation he had with Clarisse. Happiness is something that Montag wants to obtain and grasp, but he can;t seem to. He wants to be truly happy and he wants others to have happiness for themselves.

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    2. I think in some ways that it keeps the world happier, but it excludes other emotions. Especially when Montag decided to read the poetry, it provoked a reaction that seemed so unexpected and abnormal that it concerned everyone.

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    3. Personally I think that Beatty does not believe what he is saying, I feel like he is just putting on the act to keep his job. I think the world is happier with books.

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    4. I don't know if he believes what he is saying but to me the tone of this was hopeful. Hopeful that they are doing this to benefit the rest of their society.

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  94. Do you think when Montag leaves he will take more books?

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    1. Yes, I think that Montag will take more books with him. He wants to learn and be enlightened by the information and quality found in these books.

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    2. I think he will take more books with him because he is interested in them and have seen past the power of the government and he wants to know the big reason... Why?

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  95. I agree with Olivia and how Beatty knows to much about books to have never read one. And when he went to Montag's house that he was almost warning him that he should get rid of the books because they are bad.

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  96. Do you think that Beatty feels bad about hiding information from the people?

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    1. I don't think he does. When you know something that others don't a lot of times you wont spread the information until you know the facts are 100% truthful. Also you want to make sure you have your proof so that your not made a fool of.

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    2. I think that Beatty must feel guilty at some point. He is human and even though their society is strict the society still has feeling and emotions because they have rules. .

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  97. "Beatty wanted to die."(122) Why does he want to die?

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  98. On page 106, Beatty says, "Read a few lines and off you go over the cliff. Bang, you're ready to blow up the world, chop off heads, knock down women and children, destroy authority. I know, I've been through it all." Do you think Beatty once had a plan to bring back books like Montag does? When do you think Beatty stopped loving books, and why?

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  99. How is the war controversial to what is happening with Montag in the book? What do you think the war be about?

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  100. “You always said don’t face a problem, burn it. Well, now I’ve done both. Good-bye, Captain” page 121. Will causing such a big scene hurt the reputation of books even more?

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  101. On page 83 Beatty asks Guy, Have you ever heard the legend of Hercules and Antaeus, the giant wrestler, whose strength was incredible so long as he stood firmly on the earth? But when he was held rootless in midair, by Hercules he perished easily. If there isn't something in that legend for us today, in this city, in our time, then I am completely insane. What do you think that Faber means when he referenced this quote to Guy and compared the message that this quote provided to their society.

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  102. On page 122, Montag thinks, "I wonder if they were the ones who killed Clarisse..?" Referring to a car racing down the road. Why does Montag's killing of Beatty seem like such a bigger deal than Clarisse's death? What does this say about the society of the book?

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  103. How was Clarisee influenced Beatty now in this state and this time of the book? Is she still influencing him or is Beatty making these decisions because he wants to?

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