Tuesday, April 1, 2014

We're English 10 Nerds and Loving It: April 1, 2014

Focus: What larger patterns are you starting to notice in Fahrenheit 451? What is starting to shift?

1. Warming up with an artistic approach to "Dover Beach"

As you listen to the poem being read, sketch the details that stand out most to you.  

Pick any THREE images and write down what you think each symbolizes and why.

For each of those three images, make a thoughtful connection back to a symbol, motif, moment, or idea from Fahrenheit 451.

2. Enjoying F451 Fishbowl 5: Pages 80-102

3. Wrapping up

HW: 
1. Bring your yellow vocabulary packets to class tomorrow for review of words 16-30 (quiz this Friday). --NOPE!  VOCABULARY QUIZ IS CANCELLED THIS WEEK.

2. Bring your copy of F451 and your yellow chart; since the reading assignment for Thursday is very heavy, you will have at least 30 minutes of reading time tomorrow in class.

3. Start on Thursday's reading assignment, which includes pages 102-139.  Yeah!

253 comments:

  1. "Montag, you are looking at a coward." Why is Faber so hard on himself? If he felt really guilty why didn't he explain it to Montag?

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    1. He probably feels bad for keeping this world to himself. Maybe he sees that Montag could bring books back into the world

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  2. Why does Mildred refuse to talk about someone who is dead?

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    1. Because they have meaning to her.

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  3. "This book has pores it has features." Why is he thinking of this book with human characteristic?

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    1. He is using personification to make the idea of what the book does easier to understand.

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  4. on page 82 Faber states, "It's not books you need, it's some of the things that were once in books." what does this mean and does it explain why Montag isn't understanding books

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    1. By saying this I believe Faber is saying that there is no longer a meaning behind books, like the theme of a book, the message of the story. Also people can't figure that out in this society because they never learned how to this skill from reading books and analising them.

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  5. Why does Montag believe books can help him out of his ignorance? How can this be?

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    1. Books are making him question things, like why things are the way they are.

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  6. I Think that that poetry scared mildreds friends because they had never heard poetry before. But then again it they also liked it.

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  7. Why is this always an hour behind

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  8. "As if he feared the book might vanish if he took his eyes off it" p 82. Why is Faber's passion for literature so strong, why does he desire knowledge?

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  9. "Faber, for the first time, raised his eyes and looked directly into Montag`s face. "You're brave." How do you think that Faber saying this shows how much their relationship and trust has grown?

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    1. I think Faber and Montag are now on the the same page in what they need to do, and can have established a sort of friendship.

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  10. "Saying, I remember Sophocles? Reminding the survivors that man has his good side, too." (87) This is another connection to the Dover Beach poem. Sophocles was a Greek author of tragic plays, could this be a symbol or connection to the tragedies in the book.?

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  11. Montag has been very bold with his books in these last few readings. It seems like he isn't afraid to show his books to people. Why is this?

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    1. This is because he too desires the forbidden.

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    2. He is taking a stand for what he believes in and showing people what he has seen and hopefully opening their eyes to the truth. He thinks it is worth the risk which it very much is.

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  12. Why would Faber think Montag is trying to trap him when he asks him over the phone how many copies of The Bible, Shakespeare, and Plato are left?

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  13. On page 83 Montag states to Faber, "My wife says books aren't real." Could this be a product of her not really interacting much with him and she does not like that he is reading "books".

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    1. Yes because they both know that the consequence of their actions will be taken to the extreme, and there is definitely a mutual feeling of assured destruction.

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    2. Yes, because Faber sees the desire that Montag has to bring back books to this closed minded society. Also, by giving him the ear piece is another way that Faber his trust to Montag because if he didn't trust him he wouldn't have given him that ear piece.

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  15. I think that he reacted the way he did at the TV show because of how TV has made people want to stay inside and don't go out and do something productive
    does this mirror our society?

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  16. Do you think Faber and Montag's plan will work?

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  17. "I can't talk because the walls are yelling at me!" p 83. Montag seems like he is begining to go insane, is doing something this forbidden going to benefit him?

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  18. "It’s perpetual motion; the thing man wanted to invent but never did . . . It’s a mystery. . . . Its real beauty is that it destroys responsibility and consequences . . . clean, quick, sure; nothing to rot later. Antibiotic, aesthetic, practical." What is the significance of this quote?

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  19. Do you think that the fact that his wife is dying influences the actions that he is doing?

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  20. What happened to Montag while he was sitting in the train? He seemed to actually go crazy while trying to memorize the book

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    1. Montag is trying to read the bible but he doesn't comprehend the information so he gets upset.

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  21. What role does irony play in the book? On page 89 Montag says "God, I want something to say to the captain. He's read enough so he has all the answers, or seems to have." This is an example of Irony because Beatty obviously has read a lot of books, yet he condemns other people for reading them.

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    1. That seems more gluttonous than anything, which works with the whole religion theme

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  22. Why does Montag compare Mildred's friends to religious objects?

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  23. How does his wife dying affect Montag?

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    1. I think his insanity is coming back to him

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  24. On page 85 Montag says, "That's the good part of dying; when you've nothing to lose, you run any risk you want". This seems significant to something that will happen later in the book, because it shows that Montag is prepared to take risks to get books back into the world.

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    1. I agree, it does seem like foreshadowing his death. He might make that sacrifice for books.

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    2. He believes that he really has nothing to lose at this point because he sees that the life he was living before was a lie and worthless. So now he is determined to do something good and make a difference.

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  25. was a little confused on page 94 when it said "Three White Cartoon Clowns chopped off each other's limbs..." Why were they cutting off each other's limbs? Isn't that MIldred's "family"?

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  26. Do you think that montags plan will backfire on him due to the fact that society is so advanced?

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    1. I think that the plan will have minor setbacks but in the end it will succeed.

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  27. I think that the Sieve and the Sand represents a meaning that is very complex and how he describes it as when he was a kid. I think the Bible really is the most important piece of literature of all time, and talks about life before all of the books were burned.

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  28. Will montag figure out that what hes doing is too risky to attempt and come to terms with that?

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    1. No he has nothing to lose he said at this point. He is entered the mindset of victory or death.

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    2. Like I commented before, On page 85 Montag says, "That's the good part of dying; when you've nothing to lose, you run any risk you want". To me this says that he will try and complete his task at any risk, even death.

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  29. Do you think that the fact that the author alludes and makes references to religion throughout the book that he is saying that religion is a necessity in society to have free and independent thinking? When religion itself is bound by its own set of rules based on affiliation? Is that ironic?

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    1. I really think by that getting rid of religion in this society it took away people's personal beliefs and also their society has been pretty much war free until now.

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    2. I think the author is trying to send the message that without the text there is no religion. As Montag keeps reading he forgets, because all religious texts touch on free will. In this society there is no free will. Also, as Montag keeps reading it, and reading it, he can't remember. Although he references the Bible when he is talking. I think this shows how we all can read the Bible, but we all see it differently as we forget what the mane message of it all is.

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  30. On page 88 Montag says to Faber "I need you to teach me." What does Montag need to learn and why?

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  31. "Montag said nothing looking at the womens face." He is extremely lost in his thoughts. Why is this?

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  32. On page 92, does the image of night foreshadow what is to result from Montag and Faber's plan?

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  33. on page 82 Faber says " its not the books you need, its some of the things that were once in books." The quotation is saying how Montag wants a thing to escape to and Faber says that he doesn't need the book he just needs the things in books;knowledge. But if this is the future then they would probably have a slightly diferent way of speaking sort of like how Shakespeare is different than ours so how do people read the books so easily even if hes never read in depth and not being taught.

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  34. On page 82 it says "We have everything we need to be happy, but we aren't happy. Somethings missing." What are they missing? I believe it's the power of free will. There society has been corrupted with a mind that is not there own. They can have everything, but it will never be good enough. That's why you get, so many suicide attempts, because there's that feeling of emptiness. There is nothing to cure this, and as Montag reads, and reads, he will never be fulfilled. The more he reads the more he realizes why this society is so messed up.

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  35. Do you think Beatty has suspicion for montag ever since he started to act sick and not coming to work, also showing hesitation before burning the old women?

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    1. I think he knows that he has books, but hes giving him a chance

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  36. On page 89 Faber says "There`s some of it in all of us." When he says this the he is implying that Montag is a juvenile delinquent. But he also says that there is some of that in everyone. What does he mean by this?

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  37. "The voice in Montag's head was unclear." Is this voice a good or bad sign? What does the voice represent? Depression, Anger, Insanity?

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  38. Why did Ms. Phelps start crying when Montag read a little poetry? This just seems to be a little dramatic and I don,t gt exactly why everyone is acting like this

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  39. "You can't guarantee that! After all, when we had all of the books we needed, we still insisted on finding the highest cliff to jump off. But we do need a breather. We do need knowledge. And perhaps in a thousand years we might pick smaller cliffs to jump off. The books remind us what asses and fools we are." ..."Most of us can't rush around, talk to everyone, know all the cities of the world, but the only way the average chap will ever see ninety-nine per cent of them is in a book" (Bradbury 86) I think this quote is significant because it shows what the society is missing out on by not having books. Many people can not experience visiting all of the cities in the world or talk to everyone but they can read about them.

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  40. "That's the good part of dying, you've nothing to loose." p 85. Do you really think Montag has nothing to loose, he does still have a loving wife, is he willing to throw that all away?

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    1. He has come to realize that he would rather die then live a lie. And he is willing to do whatever he can to maybe change all of that.

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  41. On page 89 it says "They both stood there looking at the book on the table. 'I've tried to remember,' said Montag. 'But hell, it's gone when I turn my head. God, how I want something to say to the Captain." It says in the text he can not remember the bible, but as he is talking he is making biblical references. Do you think that he actually remembesr? Or do you think that he is making himself forget?

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  42. I think Dover Beach seems to fit perfectly in this situation. In Dover Beach it talks about how the Sea of Faith is retreating, withdrawing. I think Ray Bradbury used this poem to show that Montag has lost all of his faith with society.

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  43. What is the "THING" or invention that Faber made and showed Montag? I don't understand why he made it he claims its cause hes a coward.

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  44. "This book has pores, it has features." Why does Montag personify the book in this way?

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  45. What is the purpose of Faber in the book?

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  46. On page 98. Faber is telling Montag to stop his approach to bring books back, he says, "Scare hell out of them, that's what, scare the living daylights out!" Why would Mildreds friends be scared to hear this? Are they scared to learn in this society?

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    1. They aren't used to change in their world so when they do experience it, they are scared by it.

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    2. Because they have never seen anything like that before and they are stunned because of the fact that they have been taught that books are evil.

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  47. If montag had the power to kill Beatty and all the firemen, would he take it? beatty could be his friend or does he finds it frightening that he is the boss of the very career he fled from.

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    1. I do not think Montag really wants to kill anyone he only wishes to enlighten them and open their eyes. Because right now they are only blind and are doing only what they taught and all that they know. They do not have cruel intentions they are doing what they think are right.

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  48. On page 102, Montag talks about how he doesn't want to look at the dark house that Clarisse use to live in. I think this symbolizes how lonely Montag is right now in the book, and how he just needs someone to be there for him in his struggle of understanding why books are hated.

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  49. On page 102 Montag's actions are, "Outside, crossing the laws, on his way to work, he tried not to see how completely dark and deserted Clarisse McCellan's house was..." Does he still really worship and connect with what Clarisse tried to do and what she could not finish?

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  50. On page 81 Montag says " My wife is dying. A friend of mine is already dead...." Is Mildred really dying or is he just saying that to Faber so maybe he will feel bad and help him?

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  51. How do you think their plan of stopping the burning of the books will change as the book goes on? How do you think it will change?

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  52. Emotions are starting to change

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  53. Montag's view on the world is starting to change

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  54. Montag is starting to change and his thought of life.

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  55. Montag is starting to change because he is no longer a part of the conformist society.

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  56. Montag is starting to change in how he goes about his life and his priorities. Sort of like the guy said you are no longer montag.

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  57. The overall tone of the book is changing

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  58. I notice that the overall ego of Montag is changing as he gains knowledge of books and he becomes more and more determined to reintroduce them too the world.

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  59. Montag is beginning to change as a person and is becoming a more understanding person about how messed up the society they live in is.

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  60. Montag is really opened about his books and I believe he is going to be caught. Also he is getting ahead of himself.

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  61. I think that Montag's character/mindset is beginning to change.

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  62. I think that Montag's mindset and how he approaches situations is changing. He is also snapping a people more but I do believe he is becoming more knowledgeable. He is referencing books like the Bible when talking about wine.

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    1. I agree that Montag's knowledge seems to be growing, but at the same time I think that Montag still has a lot to learn. He isn't fully educated on how powerful these books can be, and how much destruction they still can cause.

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  63. one thing that starting to change would be montag because he is acting differently than he was earlier in the book

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  64. Montag is starting to see, he is starting to gain the power of free will.

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  65. "you'll ruin everything. Shut up, you fool!" I think this shows how Montag is changing in the book and how things are getting more intense

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    1. I think that Clarisse's disappearance has truly affected him for the worse. He seemed to be almost happy when she was around and now he has no faith in himself anymore.

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  66. on page 82 Faber states, "It's not books you need, it's some of the things that were once in books." what does this mean and does it explain what Montag doesn't understand about books.

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    1. It's saying that fiction and non-fiction can teach you life lessons about how to live or act towords others

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  67. Is Mildred really dying or is Montag just looking for help? "My wife is dying." (81)

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  68. Does Montag understand the true meaning of books in his society?

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    1. He understands how important they are to society, but can't figure out how to re-establish them as a good thing on society.

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    2. No, because otherwise Montag wouldn't of went to Faber in the first place.

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  69. Is Faber trustworthy? Why would Montag just come out and tell a random person that he has a book, especially with the punishment that would come along if he gets caught?

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    1. Montag can't do this alone. He doesn't have much of a choice to trust Faber.

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    2. I think Montag has reached such a desperate state to gain more knoweldge about books and what they can hold. He is willing to branch out to literally any one in order to get the answers he needs about these books.

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    3. I think that Faber says what he wants and truly believes. He thinks that it's not books that you need, its the information in them. (82)

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    4. The book doesn't tell to much about Faber, but since Montag went to him, you have to believe he chose him for a reason.

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  70. On page 99 the author states "He was all fire, he was all coldness." What makes him cold when he is on fire? What makes the fire have a cold side to it?

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    1. I think that the author is trying to illustrate how conflicted Montag is right now. I think the fire symbolizes his old self and the cold symbolizes the new person that he wants to be.

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  71. It's interesting to see Montag's ego and character change as he starts to realize how foolish and shallow society really is. Except, I think he in a way is still strugling with his foolishness due to the fact that he is exposing his books to Mildred's friends.

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  72. On page 86 Faber says, "We do need knowledge." Do you agree with this? Do we really NEED knowledge or do we just want it?

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    1. They do need knowledge in their society to live and be safe.

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    2. I think that we really need it because if we don't have any knowledge than we won't really know what is going on in the world and our world would be a lot more simple. Not at all like it is today.

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    3. We need knowledge in order for us to create our own ideas and to reflect on life. We can't be who we are without learning and creating knowledge for us to be our own people.

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    4. I agree with Hannah, we need knowledge to form our own opinions and to progress through life. If we didnt society wouldnt be were it is. Theyre would be tvs or technology.

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    5. I strongly believe that you need knowledge, as a society, to grow. Because think about it, if none of us were educated who would be expected to be President, who would take charge of world affairs, and who would govern us? We need some type of knowledge to allow us to stay current in the world and function properly.

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  73. do you think Montag was cared when he showed Faber the book? he said " you're brave" what do you think Montag though he was going to say?

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    1. Montag didn't care what Faber thought. He had a right to have the book.

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    2. I think Montag thought Faber would understand since he was a professor who was and still is very interested of the information in books. Montag trusted Faber with the knowledge that he had a book so I think Montag knew that Faber would help him.

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  74. I feel like people think that these books are outdated and since things have changed so much they just have no point.

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    1. Maybe, or they have been told to think that way and just dismissed the idea of having books

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  75. I think somepeople do want to die because there are so many people that kill themselves

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  76. on page 82 the author states "We have everything we need to be happy, but we aren't happy." Why would they not be happy if they have everything to be happy? Is it because happiness doesn't come from supplies.

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    1. The society doesn't have true happiness and they have other things they don't like in their lives.

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  77. How has Montag changed throughout the book? Is he better off without Clarisse or do you think he needs her?

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    1. I think that he needed her in the beginning to help him realize that books and knowledge weren't so bad but right now he's better off just thinking for himself and pondering the importance of the freedom of knowledge.

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    2. I think that Clarisse no being there is good for Montag, he gets to explore books and whats in them without her opinion.He has to decide his own opinion instead of what hers is.

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    3. I think he needs Clarisse because she gave him a different outlook on life and he needs someone who has the same questions as him to go through this with him. He is lost in what he believes and he needs her to go through it with him.

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    4. I think that even without Clarrise around Montag has grown alot as a person. He is now being exposed to how superficial society really is, but I believe that if Clarrise were to still be in Montag's life he would have come to this point even sooner.

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  78. How does his wife dying affect Montag?

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    1. Obviously he was a total wreck when his wife is dying, that happens to about everyone if their family dies right in front of their eyes.

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  79. ¨And when finally they set the structutre to burn the books, using firemen, I grunted a few times and subsided for there were no others grunting or yelling with me.¨ page 82 Faber was talking Montag about how he didnt stand up and say anything about the burning book. Do you think if he would have that the society would be different? Would they still burn book?

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  80. It is even worse when Faber knows that he is a coward, yet doesn't do anything about it. That makes him even more of a coward.

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    1. I agree. If Faber really wants to help Montag he needs to stand up for himself and get the courage to make a difference even if he gets hurt.

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  81. I dont think they are as surprised by death because it happens so often. It is a normal thing in their society

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    1. I agree, it seems as if people in this society have no meaning to life anymore.

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  82. "Outside crossing the lawn, on his way to work, he tried not to see how completely dark and deserted Clarisse McClellan's house was..." pg 102 Do you think that the books are kind of helping him find emotions that they had locked away, like sadness?

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    1. He has felt sadness, but in their society they are taught to be numb, so he's uncovering a world of emotion

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  83. How will Faber effect Montag in the long run? Does Faber have the same questions, or answers to the questions?

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  84. On page 91 the author states "See how safe I play it." Will playing it safe take you farther even though taking a risk could land in a huge reward?

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    1. No I dont believe playing it safe will take you further. If you nobody is a risk taker in this society as well as ours, we wouldnt be anywhere in life. There wouldnt be change or progress through a society

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    2. In that same paragraph, he says "I could put out ears into all parts of the city, with various men, listening and evaluating" he is acting as a brain in his plan, and cant risk himself like montag because he knows too much of this plan.

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  85. On page 85 Montag says that he was afraid of what Faber would say to him. What did Montag think Faber was going to tell him after the book?

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  86. On page 83 Faber speaks to Montag an he says " ...So how do you see why books are hated and feared ?" But how is Montag going to turn out after all the society's chaos?

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  87. What is the symbolism about the children ?

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  88. I think that there is no love in the world anymore; there are no true relationships.

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    1. But there is always a shred a hope of love because love and hate revolves around the world and it does so in this society.

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    2. Not always, i think Amelia is right in this world the love is gone or they wouldn't be doing this.

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  89. "The world must reproduce, you know, the race must go on"(pg96) They are having children just to keep the race going. The children are just being placed into the technology and becoming just as dependent on it as everyone else. The society can never change if everyone is put into the same situation as their parents.

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  90. I feel like death is almost expected in this society so when it happens on a regular basis people just don't care as much.

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  91. Who do you think is going to be saved in this book right now?

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  92. Montag has been very bold with his books in these last few readings. It seems like he isn't afraid to show his books to people. Why is this?

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    1. He thinks that they all should read them not just burn them because they have important information or they wouldn't be there in the first place.

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  93. Why is there only one say out because Mildred said to Montag " Montag listen, only one way out, play it as a joke, cover it up, pretend you aren't mad at all. Then-- walk t your wall incinerator, and throw the book in!" aren't there other ways what i he doesn't want to through the book in, he already broke the rules why doesn't he just keep it if he wants to.

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  94. What if everyone in the whole society is exposed to the books, but how will they react?

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    1. I think they would get a sense of the real world and start to realize how messed up this society is.

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    2. I think it will be a huge adjustment. Going from no books, no creativity, to learning how to understand or get a sense of what each book means or what it is about.

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    3. I think that they would respond in the same way that Mildred's friends did. They would be so shocked and closed minded that they would just go back to their old way of life and continue to burn books.

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  95. Why are books so important to Faber?

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    1. I think Faber was an English professor, so he has studied books for awhile and has seen their meaning

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  96. On page 87, Faber says, "Our civilization is flinging itself to pieces". What will happen to this society if it is brought down? Will the people keep going on with this lifestyle and mindset? Or will they change their ways and be more accepting of books?

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    1. The society they live in will get worse and worse. They might accept books for healing or help in their society.

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  97. On page 88 Montag says, "I'm not thinking. I'm just doing like I'm told, like always. When do I work things out on their own?" What did Faber mean to Montag and did he look up to him?

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  98. "We have mobilized a million men, quick victory is ours if the war comes."
    -Radio Commentary (pg. 88)
    If their society were to enter war would it ruin the values and laws that this society uses

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    1. Well there are almost no morals and values that the society uses at this time anyway so it may get worse than it already is.

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  99. What emotion have the books caused throughout the story?

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    1. To me worry because some people are worried about what is in them and if its something that no one should no about whats in them so it won't happen again.

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    2. Everybody is doubtful about what will happen.

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  100. "This book has pores it has features." Why is he giving the book human like characteristics?

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    1. It is a metaphor for the unique qualities that make up a book, which set it apart from all others.

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    2. I think it represents the importance of books, this metaphor is emphasizing that books should have equal respect that humans have. That books are just as important to the society as humans are.

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    3. I think Guy may be giving the book human like characteristics because it is the biggest secret their Government keeps from them. And because its a secret it makes things more real.

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  101. I think Montag is a medium for the resistance. He portrayed Clarisse's ideals through attractive and logical persuasion and now he has become Faber's voice.

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  102. On page 82, Montag says, "'We have everything we need to be happy, but we aren't happy.'" This made me think about how in the society in the book, it seems like the people think they're happy but really aren't. How do you think Montag's definition of happy differs from his society's definition? How does this differ from our society's definition of happiness?

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  103. "We have everything we need to be happy, but we aren't happy (page 82)." Why do you think they are unhappy if they have everything they need to be capable of happiness?

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    1. The human race has a constant need for a goal, for something better. We never have everything necessary for happiness because there is always something more.

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    2. I think this quote is significant because it shows how people living in this society aren't truly happy because they are not able to think for themselves or express themselves and share how they are feeling.

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    3. I think this is because happiness is not made by what you have around you. Happiness comes from within, and is a very genuine feeling. Things around you can make you happy for a moment, but it's how you feel about yourself as a person that lets you feel happy. You could be the richest person in the world and still be unhappy, and I think in their society they don't realize this. In F451 much of their happiness is materialistic, and Montag is just now starting to see that.

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  104. "My wife says books aren't real." Is this the truth about how people feel about books? Or could this be a cover to an opinion because people are too scared to say how they really feel? Why might they give this opinion and is scared to tell them the truth?

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  105. “It’s not the books you need, it’s some of the things that once were in books.” page 82. How do stories affect a person's happiness and life?

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    1. I think stories affect someone's happiness because in books, it's a whole new world and I think that it opens up people's perspectives to new ideas. When people read books with happiness in it, it kind gives an excuse to be happy as well.

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    2. I think books could affect a person's happiness and life because someone could read a book where the life of the character is perfect and the readers feels something about themselves that make them feel low about their presence and life. If someone reads about a character that is miserable and the reader feels empathy for the character, values their life more, and realizes who they are and what their purpose is in the world.

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  106. As Guy was talking to Faber, Faber was a little scared I think, about why Montag had a book. " I stole it." pg 81 Because Montag is at Faber's, is he asking for help, now that Clarisse is dead and gone? How far can Montag go and how can Faber and those who are secretly intelligent help Guy?

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  107. On page 88 when Montag starts to rip the pages and asks,"I need you to teach me." Why does Montag want Faber to teach him?

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    1. Montag wishes to achieve an understanding of the words he is reading. He needs to know why it was written and how to interpret it.

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    2. Montag wants to learn from the knowledge that faber has.

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    3. Montag wants to be taught of the importance of books but he is too scared to do it on his own. He needs guidance to understand that challenging society is okay and I think he will slowly learn how important books are to the society but he fears of rejection along the way.

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    4. I think Montag wants to be happy and feel what he felt when he talked to Clarisse. He has been living in a society without literature and he needs someone to guide him through it. Faber lived at a time when literature was important therefore he can help Montag.

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    5. Montag wants Faber to teach him because he is curious and is open to learning. I think this shows what is different about Montag then the rest of the people in his society. He wants to learn what is in these books.

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  108. On page 82 Montag says, “I just want someone to hear what I have to say. And maybe if I talk long enough, it’ll make sense.” People in this society don’t tend to talk much at all to people. This reminds me of our society today because a lot of the time people just want someone to talk to, and this helps people who are in bad places. I wonder if the people in this book who have committed suicide had someone to talk to, if maybe they wouldn’t have done it?

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  109. I think that Montag is gaining more knowledge to the unknown which makes him such a threat to the society. The society is so basic and un-knowledgeable because they fear a greatness.

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    1. Yeah I agree with you Olivia. They try and make it so that there are no people that are greater and that's why I think there is no religion in this dystopia.

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  110. Does it make sense for the reasons why they started to burn books on page 83?

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  111. "Already in a few short hours, it seemed that he had known Faber a lifetime." page 102. When he met Clarisse he had the same feeling, of knowing someone for a lifetime after just meeting them, and yet he feels as though he doesn't even know his own wife. I feel like in this society that in marriages it's normal to feel as though they are strangers, even thought they are living together.

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  112. During the reading, Ray Bradbury brought up the war again. Giving it more detail, but why is it in the book? Could it be a part of History in our world, or is it a painful past for Bradbury?

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    1. It is providing the reader with knowledge that this society is so ignorant that they don't even see the war around them. They are too consumed in their own lives that the war doesn't affect them.

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  113. "My wife is dying." (81) Do you think Mildred is actually dying or is Montag just looking for help?

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  114. "and the moon goes up in red fire" pg92 Is Guy telling us the moon is red? Or is he creating a metaphor?

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  115. Do you think knowledge is rejected in this society?

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